Posts Tagged ‘Nerves’

Who needs a Paradigm Shift?

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

Paradigm shift is an often heard phrase in chiropractic motivational circles – and as a profession we have been waiting for the community to have the necessary paradigm shift to comprehend and gravitate towards our vitalistic healing services. But what if it is us that need the paradigm shift?

We beat up on the medical profession and quote the growing body of evidence of harm produced by pharmacy and surgery. We beat up on the common man as though he is too simple to understand that a spinal adjustment can release his inborn healing potential. But even if these two scenarios are true – can we change them? Can you make someone else have a paradigm shift? Will a research paper convert the medical profession to refer each and every inpatient to our rooms instead? Will a better spinal health care class transform the average Jo into a compliant, new patient referring machine? If we could just get our educational brochure to say what we really want it to say, then the world will finally notice us? Maybe a glossy TV advertising campaign will convert the masses…

If chiropractic is the answer that many of us think it is – and I’m not talking about curing cancer, turning HIV+ to HIV-, blind seeing, lame walking and deaf hearing: I’m talking about the ability of chiropractic adjustments to improve quality of life – regardless of the ailment. Haven’t we been around long enough for others to notice this is happening? Maybe not enough have seen what we see because:

1) It isn’t happening – maybe the clinical benefits from adjustments aren’t as big as we would hope?? Maybe only a small percentage of adjustments release innate intelligence – If so, is this a failing of chiropractic or of chiropractors? I am a huge fan of objective functional assessments and progress exams, but in my long involvement with professional development I have noticed that few in our profession truly share this obsession. Most want a tool that converts sceptics to long term practice members – few want to have their therapeutic effectiveness or lack thereof exposed and measured. I have to be honest that I have needed to make some significant shifts in the way I do things to find ways to more consistently and significantly improve function – and I am still looking for better ways.

2) It is happening but we don’t have the evidence to show anyone else. I am bamboozled by members of our profession that desire to limit our scope of practice to musculoskeletal pain on the basis that there isn’t any evidence to support any wider claims. I wonder how you can adjust large numbers of people and not see internal physiological improvements of some sort – surely at least one asthmatic, bed-wetter, parkinsonian, multiple sclerotic, migrainous, immune deficient would have returned to their office and thanked them for the help? Maybe not? But I think that this alludes to a wider challenge – how do we SEE the changes that our adjustments deliver? Can an Xray do it, CAT scan, MRI, blood test? My fantasy is that we will develop the skill and acumen to decipher which body function tests best measure the most important changes that occur in someone who receives regular chiropractic care. I’m a bit disappointed with our scientific and academic community that this hasn’t already been achieved: I don’t think the oswestry questionnaire is the answer…

3) It is happening, and we have the evidence, but we can’t get the message out. There’s a neuroscience to marketing – and I don’t think we use it – in fact to a degree we are forbidden to use it. I’ve never been fully able to find the words or images that convey the message that I want my surrounding community to perceive and comprehend. I’m still looking for the perfect imagery that encompasses a subluxation – and it is definitely not the one with two vertebrae pinching against each other and shrivelling the spinal nerve. And I scratch my head as to how McDonalds, Coca-Cola and other life threatening products succeed where I fail. But I do know that if you tell the wrong story then you will be misunderstood – I don’t think that anyone will expect improved quality and quantity of life from visiting a profession that promotes themselves as the spinal care experts.

Paradigm shifts birth from A-Ha moments: Someone looks at why and how they do things and all of a sudden sees a problem, but more than that, they envision a different way of thinking, being and doing: The thought that a circle could be turned into transport, electricity into light, sound transmitted along wires or through the air etc etc. So what is the paradigm shift awaiting chiropractic?

We have this concept that spinal dysfunction leads to nerve dysfunction. And regardless of our technique, practice management style, straight or narrow, type o or type m etc – the language of chiropractic tends to centre back to this one concept. And we claim that this is a vitalistic concept – it’s not – it is a mechanistic concept!

IF we are vitalistic then we need to practice with model, theory and technique that are also vitalistic. Let me illustrate what I believe was a paradigm shift in my own chiropractic world. We say that a Subluxation is a mechanical lesion which can interfere with the transmission of something in the nervous system (Let’s not argue today about whether that something is intelligence, mental impulse, action potentials, neuropeptides, type c fibres, proprioceptors – Whatever). What if the mechanical lesion is not the cause – what if it is merely a symptom of what’s really going on? It’s not a huge paradigm shift in terms of language but what if a Subluxation is a neurological lesion first and foremost? What we see and intervene against is a manifestation of this disturbed neurological state. Hence our intervention does not necessarily have to be mechanical as is required by the former model – but it does need to be “neurological”.

How else can we describe the variation in adjustment vectors, forces and contact points all having similar therapeutic outcomes: Without regressing to the placebo copout that is. Many have tried to win the argument of which technique is best on biomechanical grounds, but maybe that misses the active ingredient? How often have we seen in the nutritional product world where they try to extract the active ingredient only to find that they have lost something magic in the process?

Stop for a moment and allow your mind to stretch around the idea that the Subluxation is a neurological pattern – an altered state of frequency that may manifest with tightening muscles, reducing range of motion, and amended flow of neuropetides – but the underlying state is at least electrical and perhaps more accurately energetic. When you read this, do you have this internal mental tension attempting to bring it back to the fact there must be a mechanical explanation – if you do then you are not ready for the paradigm shift quite yet.

I’ve been teaching vitalistic, neurological, tonal chiropractic for roughly eight years now and I have observed the furrowing of the chiropractic brow when I present the idea that we can forget the mechanical component of the Subluxation altogether and still be a Chiropractor: DD Palmer predicted that we would find better ways of doing things. But I often have Chiropractors approach me during the refreshment breaks asking “you’re not really serious are you”?

Let me put it another way – we have a public image problem, and a professional image problem. The public has trouble comprehending how a “bone out of place” can produce anything but a sore back bone. And the other health care professions doubt that spinal dysfunction can cause anything but mechanical back pain. And we have to go through this long-winded process of trying to explain spinal anatomy to connect the dots between a vertebra and the immune system, or an organ or even the brain.

What if you just skip the vertebra part of the explanation? If you talk in terms of nervous system only you will observe some different A-Ha experiences occurring in your practice members. As soon as you mention a bone or a muscle their minds will get stuck there and they won’t hear anything else you say. If you hear this statement– “so it’s just a muscle” or “so something is out” – then the chance of new communication has ended.

Here is a challenge for the next two weeks in practice: Do not mention a single bone or muscle. Make all of your conversations about nerves. It’s not easy for most chiropractors and the temptation to take the easy path will be strong. Don’t talk about pinched nerves – that’s a mechanistic concept. Use words like tone, tune, tension, frequency, vibration, electricity, energy, balance, harmony, spinal cord, spinal nerves.

Use illustrations like guitars and pianos being tuned, electricity flowing through the body, fuse-boxes with blown fuses, switchboards with switches in the off position, radios or televisions tuned to the wrong frequency/channel or with volume switches turned up or down too far. Talk about the nervous system and how it controls and regulates every cell in everybody – but avoid the need to then talk about spinal bones – instead talk about the flow of information around the body and how there can be blockages – and how your specialty is to locate and reduce those blockages.

Here’s what you may discover – your practice members stop asking you about whether this will help their sore neck or back, instead they will ask about the internal functions that need help. You see – they innately know that the nervous system controls and regulates every cell in every body. And they innately know that the spinal bones don’t control and regulate every cell in every body. Heresy you say? Paradigm shift I say…

Now give yourself permission to attend a Torque Release Technique Seminar to complete the shift to a vitalistic and neurological adjusting system – one that DD himself aspired to. Check the details of the next TRT Seminar at this link: www.torquerelease.com.au/Torque-Release-Discount.htm

Yours for better health and better chiropractic
Dr Nick Hodgson, 2005 Victorian Chiropractor of the Year

CHIROPRACTIC HELPING VERTIGO - SCIENTIFIC PROOF

Monday, December 15th, 2008

Below is some excerpts of research into Chiropractic helping Vertigo…

Chronic Vertigo Sufferers Find Relief With Chiropractic

Many people aren’t aware of the relationship between upper cervical (neck) trauma and vertigo. With all that modern science has accomplished, there are still more unanswered questions than answered ones. This is also true in the case of vertigo research. It’s been difficult to pinpoint the exact reason(s) why certain people suffer vertigo. However, research is beginning to point toward upper cervical trauma as an underlying cause for many types of vertigo, including Meniere’s disease, Disembarkment Syndrome, and Benign Position Vertigo.

The upper cervical area of the spine refers to the two vertebrae located at the top of the spine, directly underneath the head. C1 (known as Atlas,) along with C2 (known as Axis,) are chiefly responsible for the rotation and flexibility of the head and neck. Like the rest of the vertebrae, they are extremely vulnerable to injury and trauma. In some cases, patients may recall a specific trauma to the head or neck (such as a car accident or a blow to the head.) In other cases, patients may not be able to point to a specific injury after which vertigo became a problem. This is not unusual, since it may take months or years for vertigo to develop after head trauma.

Because so many nerves transmit through the upper cervical spine (to and from the brain,) trauma to this area results in problems to other parts of the body. This is where the relationship between the upper cervical area and vertigo becomes evident. If these vertebrae become displaced, even slightly, vertigo can occur. Unless the neck injury is addressed, the symptoms persist.

Chiropractic care involves correcting the position of these injured cervical vertebrae, particularly C1 and C2. Realigning these vertebrae may reduce or eliminate many types of vertigo…

When these conditions occur as the result of irritation to the neck vertebrae caused by trauma, chiropractic care may be beneficial. Treatments are given to relieve the irritation by realigning the vertebrae back into their proper positions. Once this occurs, the vertigo may diminish or disappear entirely.

Click Here To Read More…

Sixty Patients With Chronic Vertigo Undergoing Upper Cervical Chiropractic Care to Correct Vertebral Subluxation: A Retrospective Analysis

Two diagnostic tests, paraspinal digital infrared imaging and laser-aligned radiography, were performed according to IUCCA protocol. These tests objectively identify trauma-induced upper cervical subluxations (misalignments of the upper cervical spine from the neural canal) and resulting neuropathophysiology. Upper cervical subluxations were found in all 60 cases. All 60 patients responded to IUCCA upper cervical care within one to six months of treatment. Forty-eight patients were symptom-free following treatment and twelve cases were improved in that the severity and/or frequency of vertigo episodes were reduced.

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Clinical Study on Manipulative Treatment of Derangement of the Atlantoaxial Joint

The derangement of the atlantoaxial joint is one of main cervical sources of dizziness and headache, which were based on the observation on the anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae, analysis of X-ray film of the atlantoaxial joint, and the manipulative treatment in 35 patients with cervical spondylosis. The clinical diagnosis of derangement consists of: dizziness, headache, prominence and tenderness on one side of the affected vertebra, deviation of the dens for 1 mm-4 mm on the open-mouth X-ray film, abnormal movement of the atlantoaxial joint on head-rotated open-mouth X-ray film. An accurate and delicate adjustment is the most effective treatment.

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Therapy of Functional Disorders of the Craniovertebral Joints in Vestibular Diseases

Cervicogenic vertigo is caused by functional disorders of the craniovertebral joints. The therapeutic effect of chiropractic treatment in 28 patients with vertigo and purely functional disorders of the upper cervical spine or with a combination of functional disorders of the upper cervical spine and the labyrinth was evaluated. In our opinion chiropractic treatment is mandatory for the therapy of patients with vestibular affections and functional disorders of the craniovertebral joints.

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Upper Cervical Protocol to Reduce Vertebral Subluxation in Ten Subjects with Menieres: A Case Series

The objective of this case series was to review the management outcome of upper-cervical protocol on ten patients diagnosed with Menieres disease. Prior to the onset of symptoms all ten cases suffered neck traumas, most from automobile accidents, resulting in undiagnosed whiplash injuries.

Chiropractic care for the reduction of subluxation was undertaken. Custom x-rays and analysis of the upper cervical vertebrae were used to determine chiropractic listings of subluxation. Thermographs of the cervical spine were utilized using a DTG-25 instrument. A Toggle adjustment was used to reduce the subluxation. The condition of Menieres, which is poorly understood, responded favorably to chiropractic care using an upper cervical approach to reduce a specific subluxation complex.

Conclusion: It is possible that the true cause of Menieres disease is not only endolymphatic hydrops as theorized, but that vertebral subluxation plays a role. Further study is recommended.

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Chiropractic Care of a Patient with Temporomandibular Disorder and Atlas Subluxation

A 41-year-old woman had bilateral ear pain, tinnitus, vertigo, altered or decreased hearing acuity, and headaches. She had a history of ear infections, which had been treated with prescription antibiotics. Her complaints were attributed to a diagnosis of temporomandibular joint syndrome and had been treated unsuccessfully by a medical doctor and dentist. High-velocity, low-amplitude adjustments were applied to findings of atlas subluxation. The patient’s symptoms improved and eventually resolved after 9 visits.

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Vertigo, Tinnitus, and Hearing Loss in the Geriatric Patient

A 75-year-old woman with a longstanding history of vertigo, tinnitus, and hearing loss experienced an intensified progression of these symptoms 5 weeks before seeking chiropractic care. The patient received upper cervical-specific chiropractic care. Through the course of care, the patient’s symptoms were alleviated, structural and functional improvements were evident through radiographic examination, and audiologic function improved. The clinical progress documented in this report suggests that upper cervical manipulation may benefit patients who have tinnitus and hearing loss.

CHIROPRACTIC IN MENTAL AILMENTS

Saturday, April 12th, 2008

This feature is based on an article originally published in 1957. Few people know that many years ago there was a number of Chiropractic Psychiatric Hospitals which had unprecedented success stories. This topic deserves to be revisited…

There is a considerable accumulation of evidence that chiropractic is effective in the handling of various mental ills, perhaps even more effective in certain instances than the medical battery of treatment which includes psychoanalysis, psychiatry, drugs, various types of shock therapy, and surgery. This evidence has been piling up since the days of DD Palmer himself, who wrote that in the case of insane patients it was usual to find “occlusion of the third, sixth, seventh, eleventh, and twelfth dorsal nerves.”

In 1952, a crusading book entitled Obsolete American Mental Health Systems made startling claims that both chiropractic and osteopathy were far superior to so-called “orthodox” procedures in the handling of mental ills. Written by John Stevenson, who was for many years a prominent figure in labor management in the State of Michigan, it made such direct comparisons as these:

“Under our present state mental health programs, seventy-five to ninety-five patients of every one hundred patients who enter state mental hospitals are doomed to an asylum prison for life, depending on which state the patients are confined in…

“Investigation reveals that the private sanitariums of the chiropractic profession show from 60 to 65 per cent satisfactory discharges per annum as against 1 per cent to approximately 25 per cent discharges from state mental hospitals.”…

Chiropractors state that clinical experience with many thousands of nervous patients has definitely established a direct connection between the nervous system and these disorders, demonstrating that the latter are not always of purely emotional origin. They also state that the physical alterations they are able to stimulate in the nervous system through spinal adjustment are highly successful in eliminating nervous symptoms, including those of long duration. This was stressed in a recent series of articles in the National Chiropractic Association journal titled “The Connection Between Nerves and Nervousness” and written by Dr. Herman S. Schwartz, President of the National Chiropractic Psychotherapy Council and author of the popular self-help book The Art of Relaxation…

A valuable guide to the subject is a public-information booklet written by Dr. Schwartz with the technical and editorial collaboration of George W. Hartmann, Professor of Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University. It is entitled 350 Nervous and Mental Cases Under Chiropractic Care and was published by The Chiropractic Research Foundation of Webster City, Iowa.
Dr. Schwartz cogently sums up chiropractic’s approach to mental illness. He says: “It is logical to ask how chiropractors correct nervous and mental conditions without resorting to psychiatry. The answer is that chiropractic is a neurological approach to these problems, operating on the independent assumption now an established scientific fact-that much emotional illness stems from nerve irritations maintained by distortions in the spinal column. By correcting these subluxations, the chiropractor eliminates intense and persistent pains of obscure origin which mental cases suffer. A person with a cinder in his eye sometimes shows temporary lack of emotional control. So does one who has his corn stepped on heavily. Perpetuate excitation with a less obvious source of trouble and one begins to understand why some of the mentally ill suffer.”

Of the 350 patients in the Schwartz survey, 212 or 60.5 per cent were “apparently cured” through chiropractic, 87 or 25 per cent “much improved,” 28 or 8 per cent “somewhat improved,” 19 or 5.5 per cent revealed “no change,” and 4 or 1 per cent were “worse.” Thus in 93.5 per cent of these patients improvement was noted ranging from apparent cure to some betterment of the condition.

“The summation here,” observed Dr. Schwartz, “is that the chances are about 9 in 10 that `nervous’ cases of the sort considered, benefit from whatever the chiropractor does for them. Interestingly enough, every one of the 350 cases studied revealed subluxations of variable magnitude in spinal analysis.”

The Schwartz study becomes even more impressive when it is noted that of the patients studied 33 per cent had been in mental institutions and another four per cent were on the verge of being committed at the time chiropractic was first applied to them. More than 55 per cent had received general medical care, 13 per cent had undergone some form of shock therapy, and six per cent had had psychiatric treatment. Of the entire 350, all but five had had at least some degree of medical and psychiatric attention. Under such treatment, 27 or 8 per cent of the entire group had worsened, 33 or 10 per cent had shown some improvement, and 285 or 81 per cent had shown no change either for better or for worse…

One of the best-known chiropractic institutions dealing with the mentally ill is Forest Park Chiropractic Sanitarium in Davenport, Iowa. Its record in mental cases appears far superior than that of many, if not all, orthodox institutions. As far back as 1934, through the efforts of Hon. A. W. Ponath, County Judge of the Probate Court of Richland County, Wahpeton, North Dakota, 10 patients from the State Hospital at James-town, North Dakota, who had all been diagnosed as hopeless and incurable cases of dementia praecox, were sent to Forest Park in a test of what chiropractic could or could not accomplish. All of the 10 were chronic cases, and eight of the ten had been in the North Dakota state mental institution for from five to ten years. The remaining two were acute cases who had been mentally deranged for only a short time.

With these ten mental patients—all of whom had been diagnosed by state-employed medical doctors and psychiatrists as hopelessly incurable—Forest Park appears to have achieved 80 per cent complete recovery. The two acute cases were completely recovered by the end of the second month of treatment. Of the eight chronic cases, six were returned home as free from symptoms within one year.

Judge Ponath subsequently published a report titled Facts—What Chiropractic Has Done for Insanity in which he compared the overall records at Jamestown, N. D., (under medical supervision) and Forest Park (chiropractic). He found that during the years 1922-1934 the state mental hospital achieved 27.18 cures or satisfactory discharges, as compared with 65 per cent of the chiropractic institution over the same period.

Judge Ponath concluded, “And if this record, 65 per cent, can be obtained on cases where the large percentage are classed as incurable and had already spent much time in insane asylums and other sanitariums, how much more chiropractic could do if given the opportunity to handle the patients immediately after being brought to an insane asylum, rather than months or years later when their constitution has been run down by deterioration or prolonged mental disability or both.”…

Read The Full Article At Old And Sold Antiques Digest…

DEAR CHIROPRACTOR: HELP ME KICK THE HABIT

Saturday, April 12th, 2008

Beating addiction may take an extra nudge from the chiropractor.

When Jose Mehlman enrolled in the Exodus addiction treatment center as a study participant, he had hit bottom. Years before, he tried treatments that fell into his lap—anything that might help him. But they were “nowhere near effective.” Today, Mehlman is living a viable, drug-free life. Why was his Exodus experience so successful? “I think that chiropractic care was an integral part of my recovery,” he says.

But what does the spine have to do with addiction? The connection may be explained by the presence, or absence, of brain chemicals that make us feel good. When the spinal chord and its nerves are in proper order, chemicals known as neurotransmitters are released in a specific sequence, like falling dominoes. The result: A state of well-being. However, subluxations or misalignments of the spine can cause pressure and tension on surrounding tissue, interrupting this feel-good sequence.

Jay Holder, a chiropractor and physician with the Exodus Treatment Center in Miami Beach, wondered how patients would fare on a traditional rehab treatment program supplemented with chiropractic care. Some 98 subjects, including Mehlman, participated in the study, which was published in Molecular Psychiatry. Holder’s research found that when an addiction treatment program was supplemented with frequent chiropractic adjustments over a 30-day period, the patients displayed an unprecedented 100 percent program completion rate. In addition, initially rampant depression and anxiety dropped significantly.

In comparison, the study’s two other groups—one, a passive group who underwent only standard rehabilitation, and another, a placebo group who received sham chiropractic care—displayed significantly lower retention rates, and were about as likely to finish the program as the average recovering addict in the U.S. (a probability of about 55 percent).

Holder’s study used a specific chiropractic technique called the Torque Release Technique, which focuses less on the alignment of the bones and more on what he calls the “neurophysiology of the spine.” Certain types of subluxations can interfere with the tissue that extends from the brain stem through the spine and into the coccyx, hampering systems like the limbic system (known as the “seat of emotions”) and throwing off neurotransmitters that keep us feeling our best. Holder’s research suggests that drug treatment programs prove to be more successful with this type of chiropractic care…

Click Here To Read The Full Article At Psychology Today…

Click Here To Find Out More About Chiropractic And Addictions Recovery…