Posts Tagged ‘Gp’

Practice Tip - INCREASE COMPLIANCE WITH EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION

Tuesday, November 27th, 2007

Perceived indifference is the number one reason for patient drop out - AND - the number one need of each of your client’s is the perception that you have heard and understood their biggest concerns. A major shift in consumer power is the demand for self-help advice. While most MDs THINK that their patients come to them for a prescription; and most DCs THINK that their new patients have come to get their backs cracked; One of the first questions in your patient’s mind/s is “what can I do to help myself?”

I still remember one particular new patient who consulted me. He was wanting help with his chronic recurrent Low Back condition and had already seen his MD for an “expert” opinion. The GP had given him a sheet full of exercises as his prescription. This sheet had actually convinced the man that he was in the wrong place! You see, the copyright symbol at the bottom of the page was 1965! The guy said to me - “if that’s how up to date the MDs are then I figured I needed to find another profession”.

A lot of chiropractic treatment programs are very “front-ended” - That is the new practice member gets a lot of attention and information in the first 1-2 weeks of care: And then they become part of the daily schedule - Arrive, wait, guided into the adjusting room, face down, adjustment, “powers-on, see you next visit”, pay and make an appointment, leave. And as each visit passes they develop a growing dis-ease that they might just be a number.

Here’s one technique to help your practice members feel like you continue to see them as individual, important and cared for: It’s called drip-feeding. People respond and comply much more effectively to your educational inputs when they are in small bite-size chunks, instead of a huge plate full of stew that exceeds the appetite. You can apply this to any aspect of your ongoing systems and procedures but let’s use the example of exercise prescription:

Many DCs have given up on prescribing exercises because of perceived poor compliance and persistence. The primary cause of this poor outcome is the way in which the exercises are taught, delivered and reviewed. Instead try these guidelines…

1) Only teach 1 and never more than 2 exercises at any one visit.

2) Demonstrate the exercise by assisting the person to perform the exercise there and then - it’s fine to give a sheet but these are just visual reminders - NEVER expect a client to perform an exercise from a still picture without demonstration, and DVDs will rarely make it into the player more than once.

3) Let them know that you will be teaching them another exercise next week, and that you will be reviewing their progress.

4) When you teach them the next exercise, get them to quickly show you how they are doing the last one you taught them.

This process should only add 1-2 minutes to that consult if you do it effectively - if this is too long, this can be delegated to a tech CA who you should have assisting you if you are seeing high volume anyway.

This process achieves a number of things - implementation because they will remember the exercise, compliance because they know you will be checking on them, persistence because they have been made accountable.

When we teach the Super Posture program I show a set of 12 simple exercises which are very effective for improving postural habits, and can also be used to improve response to your adjustments. Click Here To Learn More About Super Posture…

Now the challenge for you is to review the information that you currently bombard your new patients with, and take some time to trim it down into smaller bite size pieces, to mix into your drip-feeding recipe…

WHAT CHIROPRACTORS LOVE ABOUT TORQUE RELEASE TECHNIQUE

Monday, May 21st, 2007
  1. Speeds up your decision making – provides an extremely fast assessment process that delivers absolute certainty that you are adjusting each client exactly where they need to be adjusted on each and every visit.
  2. Is so much easier on their own bodies – are you paying a personal physical and emotional price for the healing that you provide to others? Why not upgrade to a new-generation technique that is easy on your body and mind?
  3. Provides an extremely effective low-force adjusting strategy – If you are like me, you may have steered away from instrument and low-force adjusting because you perceive it to be inferior to manual adjusting. The Integrator actually provides you with specifications that surpass manual adjustment – higher speed, greater specificity, recoil and torque, pre-loading mechanism to make every adjustment reproducible and consistent, exact correctional vectors, true adjustment for force, can deliver adjustments with spine in neutral posture to reduce iatrogenic risks.
  4. Helps make the quantum shift to a neurologically-based system – You may think in your own mind, that when you produce a cavitation in your practice members’ subluxated spine, that you are releasing the flow of the mental impulse: But in most of your patient’s minds, they think you are cracking their back to stretch their stiff and sore bones… This is a sad but true fact about public perception. But, the good news is that when you shift to an assessment process which utilises neurological indicators, and adjust with an instrument that has been designed to initiate neurological change; it becomes so much easier to shift your practice members’ understanding to the fact that you are a nerve doctor, and not a back doctor.
  5. Allows them to see more clients in less time – Speed up your assessment and clinical decision making, reduce the number of adjustments you perform on each visit, cut back on the extra stuff that you do out of habit as opposed to clinical necessity – All this translates to increased productivity and profitability, and decreased time wastage and brain drain.
  6. Opens up your practice world to the emotional component of Subluxation – You don’t have to become a counsellor, but when more of your clients experience emotional, mental and even spiritual change following their adjustments, they’ll want to tell you about it. They’ll also want to tell their friends, family and colleagues about it; and usually what happens in a TRT practice is you become inundated with folks desiring and experiencing the same changes.
  7. It fits snugly into a wellness paradigm - Chiropractic has succeeded in positioning its identity in the community: The average person on the street, the local GP, other health care professionals, and your local media all think you treat sore backs reasonably effectively, and then try to keep them coming back for no particular reason. If you want to reposition yourself as a “wellness” provider then you are going to have to appear very different; and your “product” or “unique selling proposition” needs to appear cutting-edge, exciting and modern. TRT fulfils all of these criteria – you’ll actually find your practice members asking “I know this is really great for my total health and energy, and I don’t seem to get sick very often anymore, but if I develop a sore back should I still come and see you, or should I go to one of those old-style chiros?”
  8. It’s actually becomes easy to write a case study – Because the protocols of TRT analysis are well documented and consistent, because you learn neurological indicators that can be documented and even quantified, and because you seem to attract more diverse clinical presentations, most DCs find themselves having a steady stream of cases that can easily be written up and published.