Posts Tagged ‘Chiropractors’

The Secret to Building the Practice of Your Dreams

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Could you sum up all the secrets to success in practice and perhaps even life in two words? I think I can… And I am going to tell you on this page, without the need for you to subscribe to my free e-report, or register to a cheap tele-seminar, or commit to twelve months of direct debited coaching: Instead you are going to receive 100% free, unconditional wisdom!

Here is the first word – but before I tell you I’d like to introduce you to my life changing program: Just kidding – The word is “Relationships”. Everything you do in life and the outcomes of your thoughts, beliefs and behaviours comes down to this one complex biochemistry term.

Invest time and energy into healthy relationships in any domain of life and you will achieve success in that area. Ignore, abuse or neglect this facet of life and I guarantee that any success will be short-lived, hollow and most likely lonely.

Now I am not just talking about human relationships here – this principle can be applied to EVERYTHING!

Let’s break this down first – to a microscopic level. Would your DNA, RNA and enzymes function if the relationships between the C, N, O & H are incoherent? You could have a soup of the individual atoms, or even nucleotides, but unless the relationships between the components are aligned then organic chaos will prevail.

On a human level health and wellbeing depends upon healthy relationships between every single cell. To understand this in technical terms one should spend time researching the topics of Tensegrity (see tensegrity-and-chiropractic/) and Neural Holography (see holographic-brain-model-and-chiropractic/) . As chiropractors we have simplified this down to the model that the central nervous system controls and regulates every cell in every body. To claim this requires greater understanding beyond action potentials and perhaps our pioneers were closest to the truth when coining the term “mental impulse”.

Now I know some vocal contemporary chiropractic academics dismiss the mental impulse as nonsense, but these same authors fail to supply a modus operandi for chiropractic beyond pain transmission and a shallow hypothesis that stimulating proprioceptors inhibits C fibres, and that’s that. This may be an accurate small picture, but as always there is a bigger picture – and an even bigger idea.

Within a family, relationship is pivotal –when relationships break down, families decay. And we could continue to illustrate the vitality of relationships within groups, organisations, cultures and populations. Let’s face it crime and war are the most pathological manifestations of relationship breakdown.

Which brings us to the second foundational word for success in all things = “Communication”. Relationships only work when communication flows. Relationships are like the structure and communication the function. Why would RNA be so important to human existence? Because it communicates the message stored in DNA. Why do we dare to claim that the nervous system is the most important system of the body? Because it is the means of communication in the human body – afferent and efferent. Relationships within a family are only sustained by communication. Why do entertainers get paid such ridiculous wages? Because they are perceived to be the masters of communication…

Now let’s bring this into the realms of chiropractic practice.

At our most prehistoric level we propose the importance of the relationship between adjacent vertebrae, and how the disruption of these relationships leads to at least pain and perhaps also bodily dysfunction. And the relationship between adjacent vertebrae hinges upon communication – Biofeedback between neighbours that enables coordinated alignment and movement.

Many use Xrays to analyse and demonstrate these relationships between neighbouring bones, but a more instantaneous and non-invasive assessment tool is postural analysis. The downside of postural analysis is that if you lack technology to measure and record postural relationships your assessment will be too subjective to mean much: But when in ownership of technology that objectively illustrates the breakdown in postural relationships a chiropractor possesses a tool that can be meaningful to his clinical decision making, a practice member’s comprehension of need for care and progress under care, and has the added bonus of being able to demonstrate clinical necessity and efficacy to a third party (see Posture-Pro-Software.htm) .

Posture is the most global expression of relationship and communication in a person – why would someone carry their head which weighs as much as a bowling ball more than two inches in front of their shoulders when this uses more energy and creates more stress on all the supporting structures? Because of breakdown in relationship between the head and the torso, and an obvious disconnect in communication about where that person’s head is located in space. Why would someone carry their head too far forwards – because they don’t know it is there!

Healthy relationships between human cells, tissues and organs depend on this same dance between relationship and communication. And chiropractic knows better than every other healing profession that this all flows up and down via the central nervous system. Jay holder describes chiropractic as “communication through touch”. When we are analysing someone’s spinal and neural state we are asking the person’s body pertinent questions – “where do you want to be adjusted and how?” That is if you have ownership of a technique that teaches you these questions – if not then you must be imposing some external recipe of when and how to adjust.

And then your adjustment needs to be healing communication – “a correctional vector with intent” – are you adjusting each person in the way that their body is giving permission to be adjusted, or are you imposing your will on the baddest, stiffest, crookedest bone or joints? (See Torque-Release-Discount.htm) I hope that you possess the technical skills that give you clear communication from a person’s spinal column about where the vertebral relationships have become disconnected and the best approach to communicate the need for adjustment to that person’s nervous system.

Now look at the person from a wider view and if you can comprehend the definition of Subluxation as a “separation from wholeness” – then you will start to see how breakdown in the relationships within the Cranio-Spinal-Meningeal-Functional-Unit results in interference with communication within the central nervous system which will include disorders in pain, emotion, coordination and regulation. And suddenly the intent of each adjustment you deliver takes on wider and deeper implications for the individual and the community that surrounds them.

Then the other side of the formula are the human relationships and communication that either build or shrink your practice numbers. The only problem that I have with scripts in practice management is that they are usually uni-directional and that reeks of relationship deficiency and communication minimisation: The only scripts I endorse are questions – relationship builders and communication initiators. Take a look at your own scripts and see if there is some way that you can rephrase them as questions.

I can sense some of you cringing at this point – “if I ask my practice member’s a question I don’t have time to stand around waiting to hear the answer.” Here is my advice to you – be very good at hiring great team members – team members who will compensate for your own inability to build deeper relationships, and nurture meaningful communication! Sounds harsh but could be the best advice I could ever give to you?

Now what are the symptoms in your practice that you need some adjustments to your relationships and communication?

1) Insufficient new patients – The Universe will supply you as many new patients as you have the capacity to develop relationships and communication pathways with. If you want more new patients, before you invest huge amounts of money into a marketing campaign, investigate how you can increase your capacity to initiate a relationship and effectively communicate with a larger patient base.

2) Poor patient retention – If people are dropping out of care prematurely then it is time to investigate your ability to maintain ongoing relationships and to keep communication pathways open. As soon as a practice member smells any degree of disinterest or misunderstanding between you, they will leave. The skills of developing a lasting clinical relationship are not the same as those needed to maintain a long lasting romantic relationship so don’t make the mistake of thinking that I am suggesting you have to become everybody’s best friend.

3) Poor team morale or high staff turnover – If your staff aren’t especially happy to be at work, or they leave for something better not long after you have finished training them then you may need to work to build better relationships and communication within your team.

I understand that this piece may be sounding hypothetical or at least metaphorical but I hope that you can contemplate the applicability and simplicity of these two concepts – Relationship and Communication. And if you are willing to invest some time to brainstorm this in your own life circles I believe you will find a holistic way of prioritising your energies. For example – your technique – take a look and review of your “treatment” system is improving relationships and communication in your practice members’ bodies? And do you have the means to determine that you are achieving this? And are your team members aligned in their procedures to maximise relationship and communication within your office? And when you finally leave your office are you investing adequate time and energy into all the other key relationships in your own body and community?

Here are some concepts to explore…

  • So what is the role of an initial consultation = to build a relationship.
  • What is the role of an initial examination = to determine the relationship and communication status in that individual’s biology.
  • What is the role of the report of findings = to communicate your perception of the state of their body’s relationships and communication, and express how you believe you can help them improve these.
  • What is the role of your care = to improve the person’s spinal relationships and communication via their central nervous system.
  • What is the role of an office CA = to support and enhance the human relationship and communication within the office and to facilitate the practice member’s compliance with the agreed program of care.
  • What is the role of a technical CA = to support and enhance the human and clinical relationship and communication within the treatment room/s and to facilitate the practice member’s participation with the agreed program of care.
  • What is the role of a progress exam = to review the level of success of the agreed plan, to celebrate positive progress and in the case of null or negative progress to amend the understanding of the relationships and communication.
  • What is the role of an office educational process = to maximise communication, deepen relationships and to encourage and facilitate the best possible program of care.
  • What is the role of an office procedural manual = to clearly communicate the methods utilised to perfect the development of win-win relationships between team members and towards practice members.

When I teach a Torque Release Technique Program one of my intents is to improve each clinician’s ability and intuition to perceive the state of relationship and communication within each practice member’s nervous system –I like to think of it a conscious intuition… Find out more about the next TRT program at www.torquerelease.com.au/Torque-Release-Discount.htm

CHIROPRACTIC AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM CONNECTION

Monday, December 15th, 2008

A recent review of the scientific literature on the connections between the nervous and the immune systems explored the contention that chiropractic adjustments may affect neuroimmune function.

Relevant articles in English were retrieved through a search of MEDLINE and the Index to Chiropractic Literature. Key search terms included: chiropractic, immune system, nervous system, sympathetic nervous system.

The paper concluded that there appears to be numerous modes of communication between the nervous system and the immune system. It also appears, not only in theory but in practice, that chiropractic adjustments may have a beneficial effect on the functioning of both the nervous and the immune system.

For many years chiropractors have claimed that spinal adjustments can help improve the overall health of an individual. There is a growing body of scientific research to support this contention.

Click Here To Read More At The Journal Of Vertebral Subluxation Research…

CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENTS ALTERING BRAIN FUNCTION

Monday, December 15th, 2008

New Science Behind Chiropractic Care

Ground-breaking research has, for the first time, identified the actual changes that occur in the body, the nervous system and the brain during chiropractic spinal adjustments.

The study was conducted by award-winning Auckland researcher, Dr Heidi Haavik-Taylor. It demonstrates that chiropractic care sends signals to the brain that change the way the brain controls muscles.

The process of a spinal adjustment is like rebooting a computer. The signals that these adjustments send to the brain, via the nervous system, reset muscle behavior patterns,” said Dr Haavik-Taylor.

“By stimulating the nervous system we can improve the function of the whole body. This is something that chiropractors and their patients have known for years; and now we have some scientific evidence to prove it.”

Dr Haavik-Taylor has spent the last seven years researching the effects of chiropractic adjustments on the nervous system. However, in her latest research, carried out in conjunction with fellow New Zealander, Dr Bernadette Murphy, she was able to measure how brain waves are altered before and after spinal adjustments.

“This is the first time that anyone has used EEGs to prove that there are definite changes to the way the brain processes information after chiropractic care.”

Click Here To Read More At Scoop…

SUPER HEALTHY TIP… 

The statement that this is the first time Chiropractic has been studied using EEG is not entirely correct. Other investigators have shown that chiropractic adjustments change EEG patterns…

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that shows that chiropractic adjustments influence brain activity. How can that be? Someone “cracking” your back changing what is happening in your skull? Consider the following:

1) The spine houses the spinal cord - modern thinking sees this as being a component of the brain - maybe even the home of the subconscious mind.

2) Most chiropractors use modern, precise and gentle adjusting methods which go way beyond someone randomly twisting your spinal column to stretch joints open - the primary focus of “good” chiropractic is to detect the source of neurological dysfunction in the spine and to correct the function in this area.

Recently while training a group of Chiropractors in Johannesburg, we had a visiting PhD psychologist who specialises in brain EEG mapping do some testing before and after adjustments; and we consistently saw a “shift” in brain activity - on each occasion towards a more balanced, relaxed and focussed electrical state.

This may explain why so many people get up off a chiropractic table and the day seems brighter, their body feels looser and they experience increased feelings of wellbeing.

Healthier spine? Healthier Brain…

GUIDELINES FOR CLINICAL GUIDELINES?

Sunday, November 2nd, 2008

There seems to be a progressively increasing number of practice guidelines appearing on the horizon for Chiropractors. If enough of these are generated could it get to the point that depending on whom a Chiropractor is dealing with, they will need to behave and practice in a chameleon-like fashion – what’s good for one patient, may be very different to what is good for another – depending on which guideline oversees that person’s situation?

Some of these guidelines appear to be less like best practice guidelines and more like agenda-based guidelines.

Most recently the Chiropractors Registration Board of Victoria has crossed over a boundary not previously entered into, and that is into the arena of clinical practice guidelines (http://www.chiroreg.vic.gov.au/comment.php). This is being justified on the basis that they act to protect the public against unethical chiropractice – but once reviewed against the standard of everyday chiropractic one might ask who will protect the chiropractor from the public and other third parties?

And if many established and widespread chiropractic practices such as X-raying for biomechanical assessment, use of physiological assessments such as surface EMG, adjusting children and newborns, caring for people with non-musculoskeletal conditions, maintenance and even wellness adjustments are guidelined as fringe, questionable and even unacceptable behaviours, then will future chiropractic practice resemble the service that so many chiropractors have offered to their communities for over 100 years?

Most of these guidelines are presented under the umbrella of “evidence-based practice”: Evidence-based clinical practice is defined as “The conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients… (it) is not restricted to randomized trials and meta-analyses. It involves tracking down the best external evidence with which to answer our clinical questions.” (Sackett DL. Editorial. Evidence Based Medicine. Spine 1998.)

However it appears that some guideline developers twist the definition of “best” – disqualifying research and publication, or evidence, which isn’t the “best” – that is, if it isn’t a randomised, placebo-controlled, longitudinal, multi-centred, independently peer reviewed, published in a journal which the expert panel subscribes to, then it ain’t “best” and therefore it doesn’t exist…

In fact “best evidence” means the best level of evidence that we can find and what it tells us… If we don’t have the gold standard evidence, then do we have silver, bronze and even minor placing evidence to review and interpret? It is no secret that not only is chiropractic not very amenable to controlled study for a plethora of reasons, but the bulk of our evidence exists in the realm of longitudinal outcome studies, case series, and case studies. If this is the “best evidence” what does it tell us – there can be no denying that they tell us that a massive diversity of health complaints present in chiropractors’ offices, and that positive changes seem to happen?

We can’t say that if 100 “Syndrome A” sufferers present to chiropractic offices tomorrow, what percentage of these people will receive some degree of improvement let alone a complete resolution. But based on the evidence wouldn’t it be fair to say that if a “Syndrome A” sufferer presents to your office tomorrow, that it would be rational to initiate a course of treatment with clear goals and terms for review? How does that seem inferior or unacceptable to any other health care profession’s plan of action? Even after the gold standard research measures that 45% of patients receive an average of 35% improvement, what can we guarantee Mrs Jones on Monday morning? A course of care with clear goals and terms for review…

“Well it might mean that they aren’t receiving necessary medical intervention and maybe they have some terminal condition and detection will be delayed by this unproven approach!” Welcome to the life of a health care consumer trying to deal with a “primary care practitioner” – maybe the medications that the MD would prescribe as an “alternative” to our care would be ineffective or even damaging; may mask or delay the identification of other pathology; and maybe it could take months and even years to get a correct diagnosis in the medical system anyway? Sound familiar?

The chiropractic profession is not alone in the struggle to produce relevant and applicable guidelines which guide best practice, as opposed to restricting practice. “The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC – an Australian Government body) has statutory responsibilities to raise the standard of individual and public health throughout Australia and to foster the development of consistent health standards. As part of this role, the NHMRC encourages the development of evidence-based guidelines by expert bodies.” (NHMRC standards and procedures for externally developed guidelines, updated September 2007)

Is a health care profession’s registration board an example of such an “expert body”? A quick read of the profiles of members of the board suggests that there is not much representation of the chiropractic profession’s academic and scientific community. So has the board received significant funding to employ the services of such experts? Who would know – no names or qualifications of any contributors or peer review panel members are listed in any of the guidelines. The guideline which covers the issue of paediatric care is an exception: It gives thanks to a Medical Paediatrician and an American Chiropractor who also holds Medical Degree, who is a self proclaimed “Quackbuster” who deals with healthcare consumer protection, and is therefore about quackery, health fraud, chiropractic, and other forms of so-Called “Alternative” Medicine (“sCAM”): Is this our desired expert body?

“It is now widely recognised that guidelines should be based, where possible, on the systematic identification and synthesis of the best available scientific evidence. The NHMRC requirements for developing clinical practice guidelines are rigorous so as to ensure that this standard is upheld. As such, guidelines with NHMRC approval are recognised in Australia and internationally as representing best practice in health and medical knowledge and practice.”

I’ll leave it to the educated reader to review the current proposed guidelines based on the following information:

Key principles for developing guidelines:

The nine key principles are:

1. The guideline development and evaluation process should focus on outcomes: This statement shouldn’t be glossed over as it seems that some of the worst examples of guidelines are more interested in practice than outcomes.

2. The guidelines should be based on the best available evidence and include a statement concerning the strength of recommendations. Evidence can be graded according to its level, quality, relevance and strength; (Ideally, recommendations would be based on the highest level of evidence. However, it has been acknowledged that the levels of evidence used by the NHMRC for intervention studies are restrictive for guideline developers, especially where the areas of study do not lend themselves to randomised controlled trials. It is proposed that this issue will be addressed when the toolkit publications are reviewed.)

It is tradition when presenting scientific evidence, to cite the source of your evidence. The proposed guidelines of the Registration Board list no references, and request for such evidence is refused on the grounds of “intellectual property”. Does this mean that there is no evidence? Is it only some “expert’s” opinion? Or are there too many pages of citations to fit in the publication? Who would know?

3. The method used to synthesise the available evidence should be the strongest applicable;

4. The process of guideline development should be multidisciplinary and include consumers early in the development process. Involving a range of generalist and specialist clinicians, allied health professionals and experts in methodology and consumers has the potential to improve quality and continuity of care and assists in ensuring that the guidelines will be adopted;

The board’s approach is to implement this step as late as possible, input only being sort after the guidelines have been drafted; and if past guidelines are representative, additional input will only lead to minor amendments at best.

That’s also why it is best to employ a medical paediatrician and an overseas chiropractor to produce a guideline on chiropractic care for children in Victoria. Perhaps the Australian chiropractic paediatric specialists that abound and the university academia that are responsible for the undergraduate paediatric curriculum were out to lunch when the document was written?

5. Guidelines should be flexible and adaptable to varying local conditions;

6. Guidelines should consider resources and should incorporate an economic appraisal, which may assist in choosing between alternative treatments;

7. Guidelines are developed for dissemination and implementation with regard to their target audiences. Their dissemination should ensure that practitioners and consumers become aware of them and use them;

In the case of the guidelines being discussed here you can download them from the web-site – otherwise you can get someone else to download them from the web-site for you.

8. The implementation and impact of the guidelines should be evaluated; and

9. Guidelines should be updated regularly.

I look forward to the dissemination of the steps and process for implementation of steps 3 and 5 to 9 with our newest guidelines – don’t hold your breath.

So, if the Registration Board’s attempt to offer guidelines is severely flawed where can we turn?

Guidelines have been produced which would more likely live up to the standards of the NHRMC. The Council on Chiropractic Practice Clinical Practice Guideline (“CCP”) is currently undergoing its’ second revision. Following publication of the CCP Guidelines the document was submitted to the National Guideline Clearinghouse for consideration for inclusion. The NGC is sponsored by the U.S. Agency for Health Care Research and Quality and is in partnership with the American Medical Association and the American Association of Health Plans.

Its mission is as follows: “The NGC mission is to provide physicians, nurses, and other health professionals, health care providers, health plans, integrated delivery systems, purchasers and others an accessible mechanism for obtaining objective, detailed information on clinical practice guidelines and to further their dissemination, implementation and use.” In other words the US equivalency of the NHRMC.

The AHRQ contracts with ECRI, a nonprofit health services research agency, to perform the technical work for the NGC. ECRI is an international nonprofit health services research agency and a Collaborating Center of the World Health Organization.

In November of 1998, following review by ECRI, the CCP Guidelines were accepted for inclusion within the National Guideline Clearinghouse.

The CCP has developed practice guidelines for vertebral subluxation with the active participation of field doctors, consultants, seminar leaders, and technique experts. In addition, the Council has utilized the services of interdisciplinary experts in the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), guidelines development, research design, literature review, law, clinical assessment, chiropractic education, and clinical chiropractic.

The Council additionally included consumer representatives at every stage of the process and had individuals participating from several major chiropractic political and research organizations, chiropractic colleges and several other major peer groups. The participants in the guidelines development process undertaken by the CCP and their areas of expertise are clearly disclosed.

The Guidelines offer ratings of practices based on the following system:

Established: Accepted as appropriate for use in chiropractic practice for the indications and applications stated.

Investigational: Further study is warranted. Evidence is equivocal, or insufficient to justify a rating of “established.”

Inappropriate: Insufficient favorable evidence exists to support the use of this procedure in chiropractic practice.

Categories of Evidence underpinning each rating are presented as:

E: Expert opinion based on clinical experience, basic science rationale, and/or individual case studies. Where appropriate, this category includes legal opinions.

L: Literature support in the form of reliability and validity studies, observational studies, “pre-post” studies, and/or multiple case studies. Where appropriate, this category includes case law.

C: Controlled studies including randomized and non-randomized clinical trials of acceptable quality.

To download the full version and updates of the CCP guidelines go to http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/

CHIROPRACTIC AND THE BRAIN

Monday, September 15th, 2008

The brain is sexy! Let me put this another way – Talk about the brain and how to make it work better, and people sit up and listen.

Let me illustrate this with three examples: I contribute health related articles to a number of online magazines and forums, and I have to tell you that it is hard work finding topics and content that pulls readers. You probably already know this as a Chiropractor – especially if you have run regular “spinal health” workshops, covered your coffee table in health brochures (which gather dust), or grappled with how to get people to line up at your booth at a health expo or shopping centre? On one site that I contribute to my articles usually get just over 100 hits with about ten comments. This disappoints me as I believe the message I share is applicable to everyone searching the net – and when you can log onto YouTube and see some chick in knickers getting millions of hits. But to put this in context, most of the other contributors receive 60-80 hits to their offerings. Recently however I ran a piece on “how do you keep your brain healthy?” I posted this a few weeks ago now and it is still running with over 1,000 hits and 50 comments.

I regularly send in article submissions and short health tips to the local media, with the all too common cold shoulder response – “we had too many other news pieces to run this week”, “we didn’t think this would appeal to our readership”, “if you’d like to run a half page ad I’m sure we could get that article included”. Recently I promoted a “healthy brain workshop”, and received a number of “bites” and coverage from the local media with much larger than normal attendances to my workshops.

In May I was privileged to be invited to train a group of Chiropractors in Johannesburg in Torque Release Technique. The organiser had struck up a conversation with a PhD Psychologist who specialises in Brain EEG mapping, and when he had suggested to her that he believed that a chiropractic adjustment changed brain function, she had politely snubbed him based on her scientific experience. When he asked me what to do I suggested that he invite her to our program and ask if she would be wiling to do pre and post exams on the Chiropractors that were adjusted at the end of a long day of training. She happily accepted the challenge. We only had time to do a limited (“statistically insignificant”) number of trials, and afterward when we asked her what she had observed she commented that each participant had experienced a “shift” in their brain function. Most of us being EEG novices we pressed her further to explain this – apparently it usually takes approximately 6 months of neurobiofeedback to achieve this phenomenon – not bad response to the carefully selected delivery of 1-3 primary subluxation adjustments? Her response was to demand that I adjust her before she left – I think her scientific opinion had been shifted.

Some research supports this observation that chiropractic adjustments change brain function (1-3): Hang on a minute – don’t skim over that statement – CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENTS CHANGE BRAIN FUNCTION. Do you own that statement yourself? Do you comprehend the implications to the community IF that statement is correct and consistent?

Let me propose two shifts that may need to occur in our profession for this secret to get out to where it needs to be heard:

1) Our comprehension of the spine as being ligaments, muscle, discs, joints and biomechanics; needs to mature to neurones, neuropeptides, tensegrity, brain holography and quantum physics.

2) Our model of analysis, adjustment and communication needs to shift from a bone/back focus to a nerve/brain focus.

Are you ready to make this shift yourself? Torque Release Technique training provides you with comprehensive training in the Art, Science and Philosophy of adjusting from a more neurological, quantum physics and vitalistic model.

Check out the next training program at http://www.torquerelease.com.au/TRT-Seminar.htm

1) New Technique Introduced - EEG Confirms Results: (Jay Holder. ICAC Journal, May 1996.) http://www.torquerelease.com.au/ICAC-EEG-Confirms-Results.pdf

2) The effect of the Chiropractic adjustment on the brain wave pattern as measured by QEEG. A Four Case Study. Summarizing an additional 100 (approximately) cases over a three year period. (Richard Barwell, D.C.; Annette Long, Ph.D; Alvah Byers, Ph.D; and Craig Schisler, B.A., M.A., D.C.) http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org/tcj/2008/jun/n.htm

3) New Science Behind Chiropractic Care http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE0711/S00116.htm(Altered sensorimotor integration with cervical spine manipulation. Haavik Taylor H and Murphy B. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. Feb 2008. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18328937)