Posts Tagged ‘Anxiety’

Do Something Different

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

It’s time to talk about my “Life Rule” Number 3.

Hang on just a minute I can hear you think: You haven’t told us about Rule Number 1 and 2 yet?

Well to summarise; Rule Number 1 is “Breathe”. Doesn’t sound too difficult as it is one of the most basic life reflexes, and after sitting by the bedside of a dying person I can tell you just how innate and strong that reflex is. My kid’s got sick of me teaching this Rule at a very young age – Every time they had a fall or fright, and as a parent you watch that “hold” of the breath, and sense that rising of the anxiety and panic in their physiology, I would place a reassuring hand on their shoulder and firmly say “Breathe!” Breath control is a key to controlling our internal homeostasis but it’s not what I want to highlight today.

Rule number 2 is “Keep Moving” or as it was chanted in Finding Nemo “Just Keep Swimming”. Some of my practice members look a little bemused when they present in an acute inflamed state and ask – “should I rest?” And my standard response is “you need to keep moving, but gently!” Perhaps they are secretly craving a few days flat on their back in bed, with a small bell to ring to beckon their spouse to bring more fluids? Rule number 2 is a critical ingredient to any endeavor in life but it is not today’s topic.

So that gets us up to Life Rule Number 3: “Do Something Different” – I think I also learned this principle as a young parent. As your children begin to explore and attempt new milestones but at times reach a point of frustration when trying to do something new, by repeating the same unsuccessful steps. As a “mentor” it would be quick and simple to step in and show your “student” the correct way to do it – but a better life application lesson will come if they discover the solution – so instead we can summarise the best possible advice as “Do Something Different”. This doesn’t mean we turn a blind eye and leave them to figure it out, it would be better for us to make an alternative single suggestion, “reach your hand over a little further this way”, “why not try turning that block over on its side instead?”

Let’s jump for a moment into practice life and hear the Life Rule again – “Do Something Different”. Think of the practice member that appears to be responding poorly or too slowly to your care plan: This is a simple one – “Do Something Different”. Change the technique, change the schedule, change the home advice – makes obvious sense? The worst cases of over-servicing that we hear of in our profession are nearly always a case of a person with a complex health concern who is signed up for a long program of care, and then subjected to the same recipe book visit regardless of the course of their concerns. Having said that I do not believe that over-servicing is a widespread problem in our “culture”. Actually I strongly believe that under-servicing is the most serious negligence which exists at epidemic proportions in our society – there are very few people in our world that are suffering from too many adjustments – but there are far too many suffering from too few!

But this essay is not quite as simple as this – what about the person who is a loyal customer that might potentially see you on an ongoing basis for years to come? “Do Something Different!” Now I may ruffle some chiropractic feathers at this point. But the warning is to avoid the “if it ain’t broke then don’t fix it” philosophy. We supposedly reject this philosophy on the basis that prevention is better than a cure. When someone is out of pain we beseech them to continue with care, but if that care is the same neurological encounter on each and every visit from that point forwards then is that really any different – You see Maintenance is not Wellness?

Look at this from a few points of view:

1) The nervous system adapts and evolves based on its perception and response to every stimulus: So if the stimulus that you provide each week/fortnight/month is the same again and again then what evolution is going to occur as a result of your input? Let me simplify it this way – does your “technique” allow you to perform a live analysis of someone’s state right there and then so that you can provide an adjustment that is responsive to their neurological needs on that given day? Sorry to say but too few techniques truly offer this.

2) If the body is a self-healing organism, then why are you still correcting the same Subluxations that you chose on the first visit? I hear the arguments about scar tissue and degeneration, and “patterns” – but if your adjustment is initiating change, and healing and progression, then surely something has to change therapeutically at some point? In Torque Release Technique we argue that this should be occurring on every visit…

3) Chiropractic is about maximizing human potential: Doesn’t this mean that a person who is in their fifth year of care will probably need more advanced care than someone in the first? As an elite masters’ athlete, my training program develops in intensity and complexity within a short term and long term time-frame. I made my comeback to competitive athletics in 2008, and training methods have changed somewhat since my former aths career in the 80s. Even though I am approaching the 50 milestone, the training that I am doing in 2013 is more advanced than the training I was doing in 2008. And the training that I am doing in February 2013 is higher quality and more technical than the training I was doing in December 2012, as I approach my peak for state and national championships. This is contemporary sports science: But, I’m not convinced that this has pervaded contemporary chiropractic science.

Let me illustrate this with a scenario that I know we have all seen in practice: A person comes in to see you and they are in a bad way. You perform whatever analysis you do, go to work with your healing hands and send them home with some tips to keep them occupied till they next see you. They come back next time and praise you for your majestic healing powers and share their testimonial of retracing and insight. Now you have a quandary – you want to give them the same amazing experience each and every visit – so you rush back to your notes to try and discern what it was exactly that you did last time? And you attempt to reproduce that exact same adjustment. You eagerly await their next visit only to find that it just was not quite as dramatic, or worse they actually took two steps back after the last visit. What happened? You forgot Rule Number 3 – You adjusted them based on your analysis from days before, and not on the day that they presented: You didn’t “Do Something Different”!

Or you may have observed in the past that when a practice member saw your locum or perhaps visited another practitioner, all of a sudden they got a positive shift in their healing progress that had seemingly halted under your regular care. Was it that the other practitioner was better or more gifted, or smarter than you? No, they just did “Something Different”. Now I know you are thinking that you have seen the opposite scenario whereby a locum or alternative practitioner has done more damage than good – if you are thinking this then make sure you read the postscript below…

So how does Life Rule Number 3 change practice? If you want to maximize the physiological response to each and every adjustment follow these simple steps:

1) Find a technique that gives you certainty that you can discern exactly where and how to adjust on any given visit: If you don’t possess this certainty then please join us at a Torque Release Technique program to share what is perhaps the most consistent educational outcome – confidence in your competence. An adjusting technique that progresses in pace with the person’s response is pivotal to successfully implementing Life Rule Number 3 as a principled Chiropractor.

2) Build into each practice member’s care plan variety, change and progression – make every visit a new experience – not random unpredictable and hence stressful – but evolutionary and intelligent (like their nervous system).

3) Never stop learning new tricks: If you left college and have avoided attending any PD unless coerced to find the cheapest and quickest shortcut program to maintain your registration then shame on you. Commit your time, energy and money to developing yourself – for your patients’ sake if not for your own longevity in practice.

4) Incorporate objective functional assessments into your progress examinations – if you rely on how your practice members are feeling to determine their progress in care then you are at the mercy of anything from the weather, to the economy, even perhaps to astrology. People are going to feel good sometimes and be sick, and feel crook at times but be healthy. But the only thing that improves function is a management plan that works.

5) Cooperatively develop a micro plan and macro plan for your practice members: What do you both want to achieve from the next 6-12 adjustments. What will be the benefits to them if they follow your plan for the next 6-12 years? Conduct regular progress exams and celebrate the small and big steps.

6) If you are feeling somewhat fatigued or jaded in practice then remember Rule Number 3 one more time: “Do Something Different”!

P.S. If  you are now pondering how this can really play out in your consulting rooms then there are some tips I have learned from elite athletics training that I find apply to “Doing Something Different” in practice:

A) Don’t try to do everything in one visit: You can’t get fit in one training session, and as much as you may want to be a miracle healer, you won’t fix most people in one visit. So keep some tricks in your bag for subsequent sessions so that variety is easy to achieve – whoever made the rule that every chiropractic consultation should consist of the same experience – but in general it does? Dr Jay Holder teaches a key TRT principle of “Less Is More” – and this can be a hard but life changing principle to implement in the real world, especially when that 50 year old male walks in the room with extreme antalgia and demands for you to crack his back into alignment.

B) Have a plan for a series of sessions versus a plan for each single session. When I start coaching a new athlete, I have a fairly standard progression of drills and activities over a series of sessions that then has to fit and adapt with the athlete’s level of response and completion. Think through a progression of care that you would like to be given yourself if you were just starting out under your own program. I remember hearing of some old-timer therapists in Perth who had a three visit progression: On the first visit you had a hot-pack placed along your spine for a few minutes. On the second visit you had the hot pack, plus a tennis ball was then rolled up and down your paraspinal muscles. On the third visit you received the hot pack and the tennis ball care, and then had your spine manipulated so severely that the noises could be heard in the next suburb. And that was it – you were done! Hopefully you can come up with a more contemporary version of a more ongoing wellness based program?

C) Make each change a gradual progression from the last: In training my rule is only change one variable at a time – up the intensity or up the quantity or up the complexity, but don’t vary any combination of the above. This is a little hard to apply directly to chiropractic care but with some thought you should get what I mean? Let’s go back to the example I mentioned before of the practice member that sees your locum or another practitioner and suffers a significant setback – I guarantee that the other practitioner has either erred on point A (they did too much and tried to fix the person in one go in an attempt to prove how inferior you are and how superior they are) or this point C (the care they provided was too large a jump from what you were doing and the person’s body suffered a shock response).

I have a simplistic point of view to practice design and management: I try my very hardest to design a practice environment, policies and procedures that I would be highly impressed and compliant to pay good money for myself… Would you be happy to visit your own practice on a regular basis, and wait for however long you make people wait, and receive the care that you supply, and pay whatever fee you expect your own customers to pay? If not then it is definitely time to apply Life Rule Number 3 and “Do Something Different”…

To find out more about Torque Release Technique Training and access a big saving go to www.torquerelease.com.au/Torque-Release-Discount.htm

EVEN MORE RESEARCH SHOWING THE DRAMATIC CLINICAL EFFECTS OF AURICULOTHERAPY

Monday, September 12th, 2011

There are a lot of modalities available to complementary health care professionals nowadays, and many claim significant benefits and often share testimonials of miraculous results. Whenever I check out a new technique the first question I ask is “how does it work?” The answer needs to follow some kind of logical and plausible physiological principles before I even ask the second question; “is there any research?” I have to be honest that I struggle with web-sites and marketing materials that are full of claims and stories, but lacking in rationale and evidence. Auriculotherapy is one method that has continued to impress and excite me, and for this reason it is one of the primary modalities that I offer in my own practice. This is the third in a regular update of recent research.

First let’s summarise the most recent findings:

1) Satisfaction in a wellness clinic: This study involved feedback from health professionals being given access to wellness services including Auriculotherapy once a week in the workplace. Most participants agreed or strongly agreed they felt more relaxed after sessions (97.9%), less stress (94.5%), more energy (84.3%), and less pain (78.8%). Ninety-seven percent (97%) would recommend it to a co-worker. Among surveys completed after five or more visits, more than half (59%-85%) strongly agreed experiencing increased compassion with patients, better sleep, improved mood, and more ease in relations with co-workers. Perceived benefits were sustained and enhanced by number of visits.

2) Effects on autonomic function in healthy individuals: The results of this study using non-invasive assessment methods showed a significant decrease in heart rate, a significant increase in heart rate variability total, and marked (but statistically insignificant) decrease in pulse wave velocity. This translates to signs of decreased stress physiology internally.

3) Chronic low back pain: This pilot study found that Auriculotherapy was safe and demonstrated additional clinical benefits when combined with exercise for people with chronic low back pain. This supports my own observation that the best treatment for low back pain is a combination of passive and active treatment.

4) Effect on inflammatory reactions: This study using animals showed that Auriculotherapy can increase serum Tumour Necrosis Factor and Interleukin-6, and down-regulate pulmonary NF-kappa B p 65 expression suggesting a cholinergic anti-inflammatory mechanism. This suggests a neurological pathway for antiinflammatory effects of Auriculotherapy which makes sense since Auriculotherapy is a neurological intervention!

5) Treatment of migraine attacks: This study compared using a reflex point well documented to relieve migraine (group A) versus a point unlikely to have a therapeutic effect (group B). During treatment, there was a highly significant trend in the reduction of symptoms in group A, whereas no significance was observed in group B. Symptoms were significantly lower in group A than in group B at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after treatment. This study suggests that the therapeutic specificity of auricular points exists and is linked to the somatotopic representation of our body on the ear.

6) Analgesia and sedative effects during abdominal gynecological operation and effects on postoperative recovery of body function: This showed sedative, analgesic and function-regulating effects from Auriculotherapy. Anxiety was less, lower-doses of anaesthesia were required, breathing response was improved after the operation, and higher levels of serum beta-endorphin were found when Auriculotherapy was added. Anything that potentially improves surgical outcomes sounds like a really good thing to me!

7) Improving postural stability: Balance performance was measured on a force platform before and after Auriculotherapy. Main balance parameters pointed to an average short-term improvement of about 15% 1 hour after treatment and 5-10% after an interval of 3 days. However, a few participants showed a better than 30% improvement with the same parameters. The explanation tentatively put forward to account for the results was that Auriculotherapy reduces nociceptive interference and thus improves postural control.

8) Treating headache, trigeminal neuralgia and retro-auricular pain in facial palsy: In this study Auriculotherapy treatment showed pain alleviation in headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain levels. The researchers noted that treatment number should be no less than 10 sessions.

9) Preoperative anxiety treatment: Preoperative anxiety has become more frequent in preoperative patients and can bring negative impact on operation outcomes. The study concluded that Auriculotherapy was significantly effective in decreasing anxiety in preoperative patients.

Sounds like some good reasons to check out Auriculotherapy training to me… Go to http://www.torquerelease.com.au/Auriculotherapy-Discount.htm to find out more…

Now for the abstracts:

1) Employee use and perceived benefit of a complementary and alternative medicine wellness clinic at a major military hospital: evaluation of a pilot program.

J Altern Complement Med. 2011 Sep;17(9):809-15. 2011 Aug 11. Duncan AD, Liechty JM, Miller C, Chinoy G, Ricciardi R.

Abstract Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility of a weekly on-site complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) wellness clinic for staff at a military hospital, and to describe employees’ perceptions of program effectiveness. Setting: The study setting was the Restore & Renew Wellness Clinic at a United States Department of Defense hospital. Subjects: The subjects were hospital nurses, physicians, clinicians, support staff, and administrators. Interventions: The walk-in wellness clinic was open 8:00am – 2:00pm 1 day a week. Participants selected one or more modalities each visit: ear acupuncture, clinical acupressure, and Zero Balancing. Outcome measures: A self-report survey was done after each clinic visit to evaluate clinic features and perceived impact on stress-related symptoms, compassion for patients, sleep, and workplace or personal relationships. Results: Surveys completed after first-time and repeat visits (n=2,756 surveys) indicated that most participants agreed or strongly agreed they felt more relaxed after sessions (97.9%), less stress (94.5%), more energy (84.3%), and less pain (78.8%). Ninety-seven percent (97%) would recommend it to a co-worker. Among surveys completed after five or more visits, more than half (59%-85%) strongly agreed experiencing increased compassion with patients, better sleep, improved mood, and more ease in relations with co-workers. Perceived benefits were sustained and enhanced by number of visits. The most frequently reported health habit changes were related to exercise, stress reduction, diet/nutrition, and weight loss. Conclusions: This evaluation suggests that a hospital-based wellness clinic based on CAM principles and modalities is feasible, well-utilized, and perceived by most participants to have positive health benefits related to stress reduction at work, improved mood and sleep, and lifestyle.

2) Brain-modulated effects of auricular acupressure on the regulation of autonomic function in healthy volunteers.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2011 Aug 29. Gao XY, Wang L, Gaischek I, Michenthaler Y, Zhu B, Litscher G.

Auricular acupuncture has been described in ancient China as well as Egypt, Greece, and Rome. At the end of the 1950s, ear acupuncture was further developed by the French physician Dr. Paul Nogier. The goal of this study was to develop a new system for ear acupressure (vibration stimulation) and to perform pilot investigations on the possible acute effects of vibration and manual ear acupressure on heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and the augmentation index (AIx) using new noninvasive recording methods. Investigations were performed in 14 healthy volunteers (mean age ± SD: 26.3 ± 4.3 years; 9 females, 5 males) before, during, and after acupressure vibration and manual acupressure stimulation at the “heart” auricular acupuncture point. The results showed a significant decrease in HR (P ≤ 0.001) and a significant increase in HRV total (P = 0.008) after manual ear acupressure. The PWV decreased markedly (yet insignificantly) whereas the AIx increased immediately after both methods of stimulation. The increase in the low-frequency band of HRV was mainly based on the intensification of the related mechanism of blood pressure regulation (10-s-rhythm). Further studies in Beijing using animal models and investigations in Graz using human subjects are already in progress.

3) Exercise and Auricular Acupuncture for Chronic Low-back Pain: A Feasibility Randomized-controlled Trial.

Clin J Pain. 2011 Jul 12. Hunter RF, McDonough SM, Bradbury I, Liddle SD, Walsh DM, Dhamija S, Glasgow P, Gormley G, McCann SM, Park J, Hurley DA, Delitto A, Baxter GD.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the feasibility of a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) investigating the effects of adding auricular acupuncture (AA) to exercise for participants with chronic low-back pain (CLBP).

METHODS: Participants with CLBP were recruited from primary care and a university population and were randomly allocated (n=51) to 1 of 2 groups: (1) “Exercise Alone (E)”-12-week program consisting of 6 weeks of supervised exercise followed by 6 weeks unsupervised exercise (n=27); or (2) “Exercise and AA (EAA)”-12-week exercise program and AA (n=24). Outcome measures were recorded at baseline, week 8, week 13, and 6 months. The primary outcome measure was the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire.

RESULTS: Participants in the EAA group demonstrated a greater mean improvement of 10.7% points (95% confidence interval, -15.3,-5.7) (effect size=1.20) in the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire at 6 months compared with 6.7% points (95% confidence interval, -11.4,-1.9) in the E group (effect size=0.58). There was also a trend towards a greater mean improvement in quality of life, LBP intensity and bothersomeness, and fear-avoidance beliefs in the EAA group. The dropout rate for this trial was lower than anticipated (15% at 6 mo), adherence with exercise was similar (72% E; 65% EAA). Adverse effects for AA ranged from 1% to 14% of participants.

DISCUSSION: Findings of this study showed that a main RCT is feasible and that 56 participants per group would need to be recruited, using multiple recruitment approaches. AA was safe and demonstrated additional benefits when combined with exercise for people with CLBP, which requires confirmation in a fully powered RCT.

4) Effect of electroacupuncture of auricular concha on inflammatory reaction in endotoxaemia rats.

Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2011 Jun;36(3):187-92. Zhao YX, He W, Gao XY, Rong PJ, Zhu B.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) of the auricular concha (EA-AC) on serum cytokines contents and pulmonary transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced endotoxaemia rats so as to study its mechanism underlying cholinergic anti-inflammatory efficacy.

METHODS: Male SD rats were randomized into normal control, model (LPS), simple EA-AC, EA-AC + LPS, vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) + LPS, and EA-Zusanli (ST 36) + LPS groups (n = 12/group). Endotoxaemia model was duplicated by intravenous (tail vein) injection of LPS (0.5 mL/kg). Two intradermal needles were inserted into the central sites of the cavity of concha and cymba of auricular concha respectively on each side and stimulated electrically by using an electrical stimulator (i.e, EA-AC). VNS was applied to the left cervical vagal nerve, and EA (1 mA, 10 Hz, pulse-width 1 ms) was also applied to bilateral “Zusanli” (ST 36). Serum cytokines (TNF-alpha IL-6) contents 2 h after modeling were determined by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and pulmonary NF-kappaB p 65 expression 2 h after modeling was detected by using western blotting.

RESULTS: Compared with the normal control group, serum TNF-alpha and IL-6 contents, and pulmonary NF-kappaB p65 expression level in the model group were increased significantly (P < 0.01). In comparison with the model group, serum TNF-alpha contents in the simple EA-AC, EA-AC + LPS, VNS+ LPS and ST 36 + LPS groups, and serum IL-6 contents and pulmonary NF-kappaB p 65 expression levels in the simple EA-AC, EA-AC + LPS and VNS + LPS groups were down-regulated considerably (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Compared with the VNS + LPS group, serum TNF-alpha -28) and IL-6 contents, and pulmonary NF-kappaB p 65 expression level in the ST 36 + LPS group were increased significantly (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). In comparison with the EA-AC + LPS group, pulmonary NF-kappaB p 65 expression level in the ST 36 + creased remarkably (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Both EA of auricular concha and vagus nerve stimulation can increase serum TNF-alpha and IL-6 contents, and down-regulate pulmonary NF-kappaB p 65 expression level in endotoxaemia similar cholinergic anti-inflammatory mechanism between them.

5) Ear acupuncture in the treatment of migraine attacks: a randomized trial on the efficacy of appropriate versus inappropriate acupoints.

Neurol Sci. 2011 May;32 Suppl 1:S173-5. Allais G, Romoli M, Rolando S, Airola G, Castagnoli Gabellari I, Allais R, Benedetto C.

Ear acupuncture can be a useful mean for controlling migraine pain. It has been shown that a technique called the Needle Contact Test (NCT) can identify the most efficacious ear acupoints for reducing current migraine pain through just a few seconds of needle contact. The majority of the points were located on the antero-internal part of the antitragus (area M) on the same side of pain. The aim of this study was to verify the therapeutic value of area M and to compare it with an area of the ear (representation of the sciatic nerve, area S) which probably does not have a therapeutic effect on migraine attacks. We studied 94 females suffering from migraine without aura, diagnosed according to the ICHD-II criteria, during the attack. They were randomly subdivided into two groups: in group A, tender points located in area M, positive to NCT were inserted; in group B, the unsuitable area (S) was treated. Changes in pain intensity were measured using a VAS scale at various times of the study. During treatment, there was a highly significant trend in the reduction of the VAS value in group A (Anova for repeated measures: p < 0.001), whereas no significance was observed in group B. VAS values were significantly lower in group A than in group B at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after needle insertion. This study suggests that the therapeutic specificity of auricular points exists and is linked to the somatotopic representation of our body on the ear.

6) Effects of magnetic auricular point-sticking on adjuvant anesthesia and postoperative recovery of body function.

Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2011 Apr;31(4):349-52. Li WS, Cui SS, Li WY, Zhao WX, Wanlai SQ.

OBJECTIVE: To prove analgesia and sedative effect of adjuvant anesthesia with magnetic auricular point-sticking on abdominal gynecological operation and its effect on postoperative recovery of body function.

METHODS: Ninety-two patients with abdominal gynecological operation were randomly divided into 3 groups. The auricular point-sticking group (APS group, n=31) was pasted and pressed by plasters with magnetic beads at bilateral Shenmen, Pizhixia (subcortex), Zigong (uterus) and Penqiang (pelvic cavity), etc. the night before operation. The placebo group (n=31) was pasted by plasters without magnetic beads. The blank group (n=30) was given no intervention. The mental and gastrointestinal functional changes before and 3 days after the operation were observed.

RESULTS: As compared with those in the control group and the blank group, the postoperative score of Self rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) was less (25.5 +/- 0.81 vs. 28.9 +/- 3.19, 28.3 +/- 2.36, both P < 0.01), with lower-dose of Innovar [(2.5 + 1.1) mL vs. (3.4 + 1.8) mL, (3.2 + 1.6) mL, both P < 0.05], earlier exsufflation after the operation [(34.2 + 12.1) h vs. (46.3 + 10.9) h, (43.2 + 14.8) h, both P < 0.01] and higher level serum of beta-endorphin before and after the operation in the APS group (all P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: The magnetic auricular point-sticking has sedative, analgesic and function-regulating effects on the abdominal gynecological operation.

7) Laser acupuncture and auriculotherapy in postural instability – a preliminary report.

J Acupunct Meridian Stud. 2011 Mar;4(1):69-74. Bergamaschi M, Ferrari G, Gallamini M, Scoppa F.

The risk of falling is rather high among elderly people. Indexes obtained through the Romberg stabilometric test on a force platform have been suggested to be correlated with the risk of falling. This work aimed to test the effectiveness of auriculopuncture and ultralow-power laserpuncture versus placebo (sham stimulation) in improving postural control in an elderly population. Balance performance was measured on a force platform before and after both forms of stimulation. Main balance parameters pointed to an average short-term improvement of about 15% 1 hour after treatment and 5-10% after an interval of 3 days. However, a few participants showed a better than 30% improvement with the same parameters. Although the sample size does not allow reliable statistical analysis, the modifications are remarkable and some differences are observed between the two kinds of stimulation. Further testing with larger sized groups and including one further group using both stimulations is suggested. Although postural instability has to be defined as multi-factorial, it is often associated with balance dysfunctions that cannot be related to vestibular or central impairments but rather to proprioceptive deficits. A significant role may be ascribed to (even subliminal) nociceptive interferences with proprioceptive inputs and to a reduced capacity for updating cortical motor control models in the case of progressively declining locomotor capabilities. The explanation tentatively put forward to account for the results observed in the present preliminary study is that laser acupuncture and auriculopuncture stimulations reduce nociceptive interference and thus improve postural control.

8) A clinical pilot study comparing traditional acupuncture to combined acupuncture for treating headache, trigeminal neuralgia and retro-auricular pain in facial palsy.

J Acupunct Meridian Stud. 2011 Mar;4(1):29-43. Ahn CB, Lee SJ, Lee JC, Fossion JP, Sant’Ana A.

Traditional acupuncture (TA) and ear acupuncture (EA) are used for treatment of headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain. The purpose of this study is to develop effective treatment using combined acupuncture (CA) which consists of TA and EA and to set clinical protocols for future trials. Participants were divided into TA (n = 15) control and CA (n = 34) experimental groups. Obligatory points among Korean Five Element Acupuncture and optional individual points along with symptom points were used in the TA group. The CA group was exposed to ear points of Fossion and TA. Acupuncture treatment consisted of six mandatory sessions per patient over 3 weeks and extended to 12 sessions. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale. We compared TA to CA and researched their relevant publications. No significant difference was observed between the two groups (p = 0.968) which showed pain-alleviating tendency. Pain alleviation was significantly different after the fifth and sixth sessions (p = 0.021, p = 0.025), with headache being the most significantly relieved (F = 4.399, p = 0.018) among the diseases. When assessing pain intensity, both the Headache Impact Test and the Migraine Disability Assessment Scale should be adopted for headache and the fractal electroencephalography method be used in pain diseases. In the future, studies should consist of TA, EA, and CA groups; each group having 20 patients. Treatment number should to be no less than 10 sessions. Korean Five Element Acupuncture should be a compulsory inclusion along with individual points being optional inclusion in TA. EA could be selected from Nogier, Fossion and so forth. In conclusion, acupuncture treatment, whether TA or CA, showed pain alleviation in headache, trigeminal neuralgia, and retro-auricular pain, but no significant difference was seen between groups. Prospective, well-controlled, and relevant protocols using multimodal strategies to define the role of TA, EA, and CA are needed.

9) Comparing the treatment effectiveness of body acupuncture and auricular acupuncture in preoperative anxiety treatment.

J Res Med Sci. 2011 Jan;16(1):39-42. Wu S, Liang J, Zhu X, Liu X, Miao D.

BACKGROUND: Preoperative anxiety has become more frequent in preoperative patients and can bring negative impact on operation outcomes. Many studies have reported the effect of body acupuncture in reducing anxiety syndromes. The aim of this study is to compare the treatment effect of body acupuncture and auricular acupuncture in preoperative patients with preoperative anxiety.

METHODS: Thirty five elective ambulatory surgery patients were selected in the randomized and blinded trial. Subjects were randomly categorized in two intervention groups, the body acupuncture group who received acupuncture in the special points of body, and the auricular acupuncture group who received ear acupuncture. Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) was used before and after the study.

RESULTS: For the auricular acupuncture group, the mean score of SAS was 57.57 ± 8.22 before the intervention and 46.32 ± 6.37 afterward. For the body acupuncture group, the SAS score was 55.39 ± 5.41 and 44.82 ± 6.76 before and after the intervention, respectively. For both groups, the difference between pre- and post-treatment scores reached the significant level (p = 0.00).

CONCLUSIONS: Both auricular and body acupuncture treatment methods were effective in decreasing anxiety in preoperative patients.

Sounds like some good reasons to check out Auriculotherapy training to me… Go to http://www.torquerelease.com.au/Auriculotherapy-Discount.htm to find out more…

DEAR CHIROPRACTOR: HELP ME KICK THE HABIT

Saturday, April 12th, 2008

Beating addiction may take an extra nudge from the chiropractor.

When Jose Mehlman enrolled in the Exodus addiction treatment center as a study participant, he had hit bottom. Years before, he tried treatments that fell into his lap—anything that might help him. But they were “nowhere near effective.” Today, Mehlman is living a viable, drug-free life. Why was his Exodus experience so successful? “I think that chiropractic care was an integral part of my recovery,” he says.

But what does the spine have to do with addiction? The connection may be explained by the presence, or absence, of brain chemicals that make us feel good. When the spinal chord and its nerves are in proper order, chemicals known as neurotransmitters are released in a specific sequence, like falling dominoes. The result: A state of well-being. However, subluxations or misalignments of the spine can cause pressure and tension on surrounding tissue, interrupting this feel-good sequence.

Jay Holder, a chiropractor and physician with the Exodus Treatment Center in Miami Beach, wondered how patients would fare on a traditional rehab treatment program supplemented with chiropractic care. Some 98 subjects, including Mehlman, participated in the study, which was published in Molecular Psychiatry. Holder’s research found that when an addiction treatment program was supplemented with frequent chiropractic adjustments over a 30-day period, the patients displayed an unprecedented 100 percent program completion rate. In addition, initially rampant depression and anxiety dropped significantly.

In comparison, the study’s two other groups—one, a passive group who underwent only standard rehabilitation, and another, a placebo group who received sham chiropractic care—displayed significantly lower retention rates, and were about as likely to finish the program as the average recovering addict in the U.S. (a probability of about 55 percent).

Holder’s study used a specific chiropractic technique called the Torque Release Technique, which focuses less on the alignment of the bones and more on what he calls the “neurophysiology of the spine.” Certain types of subluxations can interfere with the tissue that extends from the brain stem through the spine and into the coccyx, hampering systems like the limbic system (known as the “seat of emotions”) and throwing off neurotransmitters that keep us feeling our best. Holder’s research suggests that drug treatment programs prove to be more successful with this type of chiropractic care…

Click Here To Read The Full Article At Psychology Today…

Click Here To Find Out More About Chiropractic And Addictions Recovery…

CHIROPRACTIC EVOLUTION

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2007

Through the mid-nineties pivotal chiropractic research was conducted and was published at the beginning of the 21st Century, and yet a large segment of the profession missed it! Why?

1) The findings weren’t published in a peer-reviewed chiropractic journal – they were actually published in two major psychiatric journals; the Journal of Molecular Psychiatry (published by Nature) and the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs: No chiropractor would have received these journals in their post-box.

2) The research involved a patient population commonly ignored by comfortable middle-class chiropractors, namely an addicted population. But this study population was chosen for very specific scientific reasons – they biogenetically possess an inability to achieve a state of wellbeing.

Why was this research potentially so paradigm shifting for the chiropractic profession?

1) The design of the study was overseen by a leading medical biostatistician from the University of Miami, School of Medicine: Nothing was included in the study unless it stood up to his rigorous statistical and evidence-based standards.

2) The study involved randomization, and all of the scientific design expected of longitudinal clinical research, and, three-arms – not just active treatment and control groups, but also a placebo-control group.

3) The acceptance and rejection of various chiropractic examination procedures which lead to a short-list of evidence-based indicators of Subluxation, ultimately synthesizing a technique for analyzing and differentially diagnosing a Primary Subluxation.

4) The need to design an adjusting instrument that provided true reproducibility of the adjustive thrust and the vectors of the classic chiropractic adjustment – the Toggle Recoil.

5) Acceptance of the research results by peer review panels far more rigorous and skeptical than normal chiropractic peer review.

6) A documentary featured on Discovery Health Channel highlighting the findings of the research and giving chiropractic a glowing review.

What was so impressive about the results? To understand this we need to tell you a little about the clients accepted into the trial: These were recovering addicts with many substance-abusing habits, who were undergoing normal 30-day withdrawal in an in-patient facility… Nasty stuff: Major withdrawals, cravings, severe physical and mental symptoms, abstinence-based challenges… all going on at the same time. What happened when they received specific chiropractic adjustments?

1) They finished the program: The gold-standard of recovery is how many clients make it to the end of the thirty days? Good rehab facilities achieve somewhere around 70% retention. When they were adjusted as well, the retention rate increased to 100%… That’s right no-one left! In recovery circles it is common knowledge that if someone drops out of care it isn’t because they’ve started a new job, or had a miraculous healing and didn’t need to hang around. No, they’ll usually be back in their old haunts doing the same old stuff. This finding is huge – if they stayed they must have been doing really well.

2) Their anxiety levels dropped dramatically: This research project didn’t just measure one outcome, it also utilized internationally accepted state of wellbeing questionnaires: When the clients were adjusted the Spielberger’s State of Anxiety Test scores dropped the same amount that it normally takes six months of standard care to achieve.

3) Their depression levels dropped markedly. When the clients were adjusted the Beck’s depression inventory scores dropped the same amount that it normally takes twelve months of standard care to achieve.

4) They didn’t need the usual nursing and first-aid measures demanded by this population. Nursing station visits are actually the biggest overheads in running a rehab facility: When the clients were adjusted only 9% needed to make any nursing station visits – the placebo and normal care groups made visits in 56% and 48% of cases respectively (that’s right the placebo group was more miserable than the normal care group – so much for the argument that chiropractic is a good placebo – this suggest it’s actually a “nocebo”!)

Now wait a minute I hear many of you saying – “I have no interest in treating drug addicts in my practice, so why would I want to learn a technique to treat them?”

Here is the point… the CHIROPRACTIC IN THIS STUDY DID NOT TREAT ADDICTION, IT ADJUSTED SUBLUXATIONS. The in-patient program treated the addiction with the normal abstinence strategies, group therapy, counseling etc. The chiropractic produced massive increases in state of wellbeing, helping the recovery to be more effective. You need to learn how to produce such massive increases in state of wellbeing to, in all of your practice members…

Isn’t this what great chiropractic is about? We don’t fix them, but when we adjust them their body’s healing and recuperative processes are exponentially released to fulfill their true potential – great chiropractic that is…

So why would you learn Torque Release Technique the chiropractic model that evolved through this scientific process?

1) Wouldn’t you love your client retention to reach record proportions? There’s only one thing that really increases retention – RESULTS. You might be a great salesperson and be able to coerce people into hanging around, but when they FEEL the benefits they don’t need any convincing.

2) No-one refers like an excited customer: Do you think that massive changes in emotional and mental status would excite your clients? When their back pain’s gone they quickly forget why they are coming to see you: But when the lights get turned on every adjustment, you’ll be impressed when they start to ask if it is alright for them to regularly come back for more, and and can they bring someone else with them?

3) If we are truly a wellness profession, then our clients’ dependence on symptomatic and crisis care should start to vanish. How thankful do you think your clients will be when they notice how they aren’t spending so much on panadol, panadeine and nurofen, and they no longer have to spend ages sitting in the MD’s waiting room with all those miserably infectious people? How much easier will your practice hours be when no-one is winging and whining about their latest ache?

4) Wouldn’t you like to get to the end of the day after having seen more clients than ever before, and not be emotionally and physically spent? With TRT you can speed up your decision making, reduce the number of adjustments per visit, and minimise all the extra stuff you do trying to hit the right spot.

5) So you can be sure you are using the most evidence-based technique ever available to the chiropractic profession. Make sure you have total proficiency in the procedures accepted by one of medicine’s top biostatisticians – discover if you’re wasting your time doing stuff that was rejected?

6) So you can access the Integrator Adjusting Instrument, the only instrument with pre-loading, recoil, torque, stunningly high speed (1/10,000 sec), low force, and neurologically-based impulse frequency.

7) To be trained in the technique that provides you with the vitalistic, tonal, non-linear, neurologically-based adjusting technique to go hand-in-hand with your vitalistic chiropractic philosophy – Leave behind the mechanistic methods that have held back chiropractic practice in the twentieth century.